In this article, we take a look at 5 key things to consider when developing online training courses for your employees.


Sometimes it seems that you cannot go a day without hearing a mention of mLearning (mobile learning) in our little eLearning world. The market opportunity being spoken of is truly huge – a recent report by research firm Markets and Markets pegged the total spend on mobile learning in 2020 at $ 37.6 billion. Pretty much every player in the space has to sit up and take notice of such numbers. There has been a lot written, including by us, about situations where mLearning should become the preferred choice. That being said, though, what are the downsides? What are the situations where you should consider not climbing onto the mLearning bandwagon?


Late in September and early in October I made my way to the MGM Grand in Las Vegas NV along with 2800 other learning, eLearning and Training & development enthusiasts for the eLearning Guild’s DevLearn 2015. I have been to a few of these, but this year’s event was huge – everything right from the keynotes, the sessions, the pre-conference workshops, demo-fest, the expo et al. The buzz is this was the biggest DevLearn ever – I would not be surprised if that were true.


9 Key Benefits of Using Video in eLearning

There are more than 1 billion active users on YouTube, and every minute close to 400 hours worth of video content is uploaded to this platform. With the advent of mobile devices, people are spending more and more time in watching videos – for entertainment as well as for education. Per mobile session, the average time spent on YouTube is 40 minutes! The eLearning industry has no option but to adapt to these changing habits of the learners. The supporters of interactive eLearning are vouching for videos in eLearning courses as one of the most prominent trends.


It is common knowledge that Adobe Flash is not supported on iPhones and iPads. While Apple has been a long-standing critic of Flash, recently the software from Adobe found criticism from two more technology companies – Mozilla and Facebook. Recently, Mozilla’s technical team decided to block Adobe Flash from the Firefox browser. And a week before, Facebook’s Chief Security Officer had asked Adobe to announce the end-of-life date for Flash as the software is too vulnerable from a security point of view. In light of these developments, it is widely predicted that the future of Flash is at risk.


When it comes to deciding a mode of training, organizations often find it confusing to choose between self-paced learning and classroom/virtual training. There are various myths around the effectiveness of self-paced learning. However, in reality, self-paced learning can significantly enhance the learning experience. Let’s look at some of the advantages of self-paced learning.


Smartphones and tablets are not anything new. And the increasing number of companies venturing into this domain stands testimony to the fact that people have become much more technology-savvy than they were until a couple of years back. Smartphones have become a preferred choice for learning on the go. Whether they are to be used as a new music system or new learning tools, smartphones are handy in their own ways. An increasing number of organizations are willing to invest in the Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) policy to encourage learning. It is exactly at this point it becomes important to convert Flash-based legacy courses into open-sourced technology, HTML5, so that they become compatible with mobile devices. Articulate Storyline is the preferred choice when it comes to converting legacy training material into HTML5 and in this article I’ll show you why.


Imagine a situation where you have attended a tool-related training course and have been asked to work on the tool a couple of months later. When you try to work on the tool, you do not seem to remember most of the content; here comes the need of performance support. We all know that we are hardly able to retain 30% of what we are taught within 48 hours of training. You scan through the web, ask people around you, and even contact the support team, but you can barely manage to solve the issue. Now, rewind and think of how much resources are wasted during the time it took you to access the information from various sources. Indeed, a lot!


Across the world, organizations spend millions of dollars on eLearning to meet the learning and development needs of their employees. To ensure the success of their eLearning initiatives, organizations rely on various means such as using the latest eLearning technology and creating engaging content. However, in spite of the efforts, organizations still encounter challenges like low rates of completion or low adoption in eLearning culture.


It’s common these days for companies to have offices in multiple countries, and comforting to rely on tailored eLearning experiences that maintain the company’s missions and values, regardless of which side of the world their employees are on. However it can be overwhelmingly frustrating to develop a course with the intention of getting everyone on the same page, only to later discover the situation has been made worst through misinterpretation. Content being “lost in translation” should never be an excuse for the failure of reaching learning objectives and goals, and that’s why localization plays a huge role in the design of course development. Here are 7 tips for designing an eLearning for better localization: